A framework of beams and columns in which inclined, often diagonal, structural members brace the building and provide strength and rigidity. The bracing can take a variety of forms. If diagonal members are stocky they resist both tension and compression forces. However if slender, they resist tension forces only. Usually, braced frame members are triangulated and meet at joints (similar to a vertical truss). Eccentrically Braced Frames are the exception - their inclined members are deliberately offset at joints in order to create ductile fuse regions in the steel beams. Braced Frames may or may not be infilled.

LFBR_diagram_Charleson_2

A simplified drawing of a typical cross-braced frame structure (A. Charleson, Seismic Design for Architects, Architectural Press 2008, p. 64, Fig. 5.2).

LFBR_diagram_Charleson_1

Examples of different types of braced frames (A. Charleson, Seismic Design for Architects, Architectural Press 2008, p. 77, Fig. 5.23).

LFBR_Mexico_Scawthorn_1

Exterior braced frame as a retrofit scheme for a reinforced concrete building, Mexico (C. Scawthorn)

LFBR_USA_Brzev_2

Braced frame (Chevron braces), Seattle, USA (S. Brzev)

Braced Frame 1.JPG

Eccentrically braced steel frame under construction, New Zealand (A. Charleson)

LFBR_Canada_Brzev_1

Concentrically braced steel frame under construction, Canada (S. Brzev)

Braced Frame 2.JPG

 

Concentrically braced frame, India (A. Charleson)

Braced Frame 3.JPG

 

Braced frame, Iran (A. Charleson)

LFBR_Seattle_USA_BrzevS_1

 

 

LFBR_Seattle_USA_BrzevS_2

 

 

 

Steel braced frame, Seattle, USA (S. Brzev)

LFBR_University Hall_Berkeley_USA_1

Exterior steel braced frame as a retrofit solution, University Hall, University of Berkeley, California (S. Brzev)

LO_China_Brzev_1LO_China_Brzev_3

Birds Nest Stadium in Beijing, China has a 3-D braced frame structural system (S. Brzev)